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IPO

The Secret to a Successful IPO

There are many measures of success for initial public offerings (IPOs). First and foremost is completing the deal and raising the intended proceeds. From the perspective of remaining and new shareholders, however, the subsequent short-term trading performance is more often seen as the measure of a good IPO as opposed to a bad one.

For the board and management of the newly listed entity, their measure of success and their reputation will depend on how well the newly listed entity performs in the medium term and delivers on the investment proposition on which new shareholders based their investment decision.

Different stages

It is important for ongoing board and management to recognise that there are two quite different stages in the journey to becoming a successful listed entity.

The first is all about the transaction which delivers the listing.

Many management teams mistakenly see this as the ultimate objective and, following months of frenetic activity, expect their lives to return to the way they were pre-IPO when they can once again concentrate on running the business. Regrettably, that is not the case. It is quickly discovered, as they move into the relationship stage, that life will never be the same because new obligations and responsibilities require a significant cultural change.

The second involves building relationships with new shareholders, which requires time.

So, what should Board and management of a new IPO company be doing to ensure that the transition to a listed entity is as seamless as possible and places them in the best possible position to build a successful relationship with their new shareholders?

Firstly, thought should be given at an early stage to governance issues such as board composition – diversity, independence, and skills matrix – and remuneration structures. This helps to ensure that the entity does not run into issues with regulators, shareholders, and governance advisers once listed.

Much of this work is often done by advisers and bankers to the IPO who, understandably, are generally less available post-IPO. So, having a dedicated internal resource involved in the IPO process provides continuity and, possibly, a candidate to run the Investor Relations (IR) program post-listing.

Essential Support

Once the IPO is complete, the onus is on management to recognise that the act of becoming a listed entity will make a substantial difference to how the organisation is run. As well as having a significant number of new shareholders, who will not understand the business in the same depth and detail as management, the organisation’s reporting and disclosure regime will be quite different. Senior management need to understand new requirements covering issues such as continuous disclosure and dealing in the entity’s equities. Failure to adhere to these new rules can create serious reputational damage to the organisation, the board, and the management team.

The organisation also needs to understand quickly what its obligations are in terms of interacting with its new shareholders and how it plans to develop and execute an effective IR program. Like any corporate function, the IR program needs to be appropriately resourced, well planned and executed and monitored on an ongoing basis.

Both the CEO and CFO need to show leadership and be committed to its success, particularly for smaller organisations where the appointment of a dedicated IR function may not be cost-effective.

Often the IPO company outsources the post-IPO work to specialists who then work with the company on an ongoing basis. We can recommend a number of these specialists if required.

From the board and management’s perspective, the success of an IPO will not be measured by the issue price or the premium achieved on listing. Rather, they will be judged on their ability to take the new entity and deliver long-term value for shareholders. There are many factors that will impact performance, some of which will be outside of management’s control.

However, engagement during the IPO process with a view to recognising the interests of new shareholders and working in advance of the IPO to develop an effective plan to manage these new relationships post-listing will go a long way to delivering an excellent outcome for all stakeholders.

Introduction

A foreign company completing a listing on the ASX may have a large part of its shares on issue held by management and pre-IPO investors and these are usually subject to escrow and may not be able to be traded for a period of time.

This means that there could be a smaller number of “free trading” shares in the market and the company has reduced “share liquidity”.

All companies completing their first listing have been private or unlisted public companies and may not have had an independent board of directors, limited internal controls and corporate governance or are not at the standard required for a listed company.

Unlisted companies have not had to bother about what the investing public thinks about them, nor did they have to concern themselves too much with corporate regulators or the stock exchange.

The owners of foreign companies often do not understand the Australian culture or the capital markets.

All the above are real challenges for newly listed companies and need to be addressed so that the company will flourish post IPO.

Share Liquidity

The company should aim at increasing its “share liquidity”.

An illiquid stock will not be attractive to investors, as they fear that they will not be able to quickly sell their shares and the market views with some suspicion the value of a company with low liquidity.

Ultimately the major owners of the company may wish to sell their shares, and this will be difficult in a stock with low liquidity.

Additionally, where there are few shares able to be traded in the market the sale or purchase of a small number of shares can detrimentally affect the price.

The usual and best way to increase liquidity is to issue more shares to new investors via a secondary issue after the IPO so that there are many investors holding and trading the shares. Before such a decision is made however, there are several matters for individual companies to consider.

Having an informed public which is commented on below is vital as is having a “house” stockbroker / market-maker whose duty is to ensure as far as possible orderly trading in the company’s shares.

Independent Board of Directors

The corporate and ASX regulations governing listed companies require that there be a reasonable number of independent directors on the Board.

An owner of a previously unlisted company can face a learning curve having to share his control with other directors on a listed company.

Learning how to deal with independent directors is a matter of getting to know them over a period, establishing proper communication between directors and having them committed to the company’s values and aspirations.

Internal controls

An unlisted company owned usually by one or two persons might not have internal controls over the safeguarding of its cash and its various assets to the standard required of directors of a listed company, where the very highest standards are required.

A company can obtain assistance to achieve and continue such controls.

Corporate Governance

The corporate regulator and the ASX require remarkably high standards of corporate governance by listed companies.

Most companies strive to have a high level of corporate governance.

These days it is not enough for a company to merely be profitable, it also needs to demonstrate good corporate citizenship through environmental awareness, ethical behavior, and sound corporate governance practices.

Corporate governance essentially involves balancing the interests of the many stakeholders in a company-these include its shareholders, management, customers, suppliers, financiers, government, and the community. Since corporate governance also provides the framework for attaining a company’s objectives, it encompasses practically every sphere of management, from action plans and internal controls to performance, measurement, and corporate disclosure.

Breach of these standards could lead to suspension of the company from the ASX, a large downturn in the value of the company’s shares, legal action taken against the directors and even class actions taken against the company.

It is vital that the company’s reputation be spotless

Ensuring a high standard of corporate governance rests with the directors, however they should be supported by assistance from specialists knowledgeable in this field.

The investing public

The public markets must be kept aware of the company’s activities and how it is progressing and prospering.

If the company does not inform them then how are they to know? An uninformed public will have little interest in the company’s shares.

Informing the public should be a priority of a listed company and a corporate public relations program and investor relations programs managed by professionals often achieves this.

The Australian culture and the capital markets

This is one of the major problems for a “foreign“ company listing in Australia or for that matter in any Western country, however it can be overcome in most cases by having some professional assistance.

Dos and Don’ts

The following tips are for companies which seek to go to public:

Dos Don’ts
Keep the market fully informed, especially with materially significant information Overhype the stock prior to IPO
Have a small board with a mix of technical and commercial experience and qualifications Set-up overly large board
Separate technical and commercial director roles and physical separation of offices Directors that do not have the right skill set
Have a proven track record of success with directors Appoint directors with little or no industry experience or who have “background” issues.
Approach governance as a value adding process for shareholders, not a compliance nuisance Ignore or downsize the importance of governance.
Invest in a culture of transparency Be wary of directorship conflicts
Automate email news alerts and build your email database Miss strategy milestones.
Communicate frequently and regularly with stakeholders Complicated or highly technical presentations no one can understand
Have a combination of quality assets Have mediocre or substandard assets.
Implement a sound capital structure Have haphazard and careless company financing,
Pitch and refine the investment story Poor timing trying to raise capital during major holiday periods
Seek external help in non-core areas such as marketing and financial PR Avoid long periods with no news flow to investors
Keep momentum in your second year A lack of support from a major broking house or institutional investoron

Post-IPO

It is vital that the company commits time and some costs to post-IPO matters which usually include:

  • obtaining the services of a “house” stockbroker / market-maker
  • Issuing more shares to new investors at an appropriate time to enhance share liquidity
  • managing and enhancing the relationship between all directors
  • ensuring that as far as possible the share price is not affected by the sale of shares below market expectations
  • continual road shows to investors
  • continual public relations and media coverage
  • understanding its future objectives and assisting the company to achieve these
  • having observers at Directors meetings and strategy meetings who are available for advice on corporate matters as needed
  • ensuring that the company has strict internal control and corporate governance procedures
  • ensuring that culture issues are considered and overcome

Appendix

Examples of Good and Bad Post-IPO Performance

The value of the company’s shares is one of the most important factors to shareholders. An increasing share price can allow the company to raise more funding in the future and use its shares in transactions such as an acquisition of another business. If the share price increases, it means that the existing shareholders suffer less dilution. If the share price decreases the opposite of the above usually applies.

Examples of Good and Bad Post-IPO Performance

About BlueMount Capital

BlueMount Capital specialises in bringing US companies to the ASX, and has an office in Los Angeles to service its American clients.

Len McDowall
Managing Director
Level 32 200 George St
Sydney 2000 Australia
Telephone +61 2 8277 4112
Email sydney@bluemountcapital.com

Alex Chen
Director and USA representative
1055 W 7th, 33rd Floor, Penthouse
Los Angeles CA 90017 USA
Telephone +1 212 470 6997
Email losangeles@bluemountcapital.com

Technology and International Stock Exchange Listings for US companies

An IPO is often the most important capital markets and wealth creation event in a corporate life cycle. Unmatched access to capital at a lower cost is a clear benefit in favour of an IPO, along with corporate branding opportunities and a host of other benefits.

Companies consider three things when choosing a listing location—the actual out-of-pocket costs for establishing and maintaining the listing, the effects on valuation and liquidity, and the nonfinancial benefits.

However, before addressing these substantial IPO listing considerations a US private company considering an IPO, with a value of less than US$1 billion must realise that it is almost certainly too small to list successfully in the USA these days. Moreover, the competitiveness of the US public market has been seriously challenged in recent years as indicated below:

  • The age of companies at time of a US IPO has increased (from ~6.5 to ~10.5 years);
  • The annual number of US IPOs decreased (from ~400 to ~100);
  • The valuation of US IPOs has increased more than 6x.

IPOs in the United States typically have significantly high expenses. Legal and accounting fees, printing, brokerage charges to raise the capital, insurances, director fees and other related expenses are substantially higher than in many other countries.

In particular, companies trying to go public in the US are prone to litigation and enormous expense. Floats are fewer but larger, because by the time the company reaches a stage where it can afford to list, it is mature. For a technology company to list on Nasdaq, it needs to be circa US $ 1 billion to get any traction. Conversely, listing overseas, for example on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX), can present itself as the ideal market for technology companies valued under US$ 1billion.

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulatory compliance expenses are also significantly higher than internationally. These expenses can become very material for companies having a post-IPO market value of less than US$ 1billion. It is often felt that in the United States a small company has to pay too much in fees and discounts when it sells its stock to the public.

Destinations for US companies under US 1billion in value.

There are two self-contained regions that are popular with US companies wishing to go public, outside of the USA, which are Europe and Asia Pacific. However, Australia also represents an increasingly popular destination.

Why are foreign companies listing in Australia?

Australia’s large fast -growing pension pool, main board listing and earlier entry to globally recognised indices makes the ASX the exchange of choice for international companies. To date, more than 280 international companies are listed on ASX.

Access to growth capital is the major attraction of the ASX for international listings and this article explains how and why this is the case.
Australia has the fourth largest pension pool globally and also one of the fastest growing. Superannuation assets total A$2.6 trillion and this is predicted to grow to A$9.5 trillion by 2035.

The reason behind the size of the Australian pension pool is the compulsory superannuation system introduced by the Australian Federal Government in 1992. The sheer weight of this pool, where a large percentage is mandated to invest directly in ASX-listed securities, makes the Australian market an attractive venue for international companies looking to access capital for growth.

Why the ASX?

In addition to capital, an ASX listing offers a number of other benefits for an international company looking at global public markets. These include a highly active exchange, a main board listing and earlier entry to globally recognised indices.

The ASX is a very active exchange, typically exceeding 120 initial public offerings (IPOs) a year and trading volumes averaging $5.6 billion on a daily basis.

The ASX’s main board listing, provides a globally recognised robust regulatory environment and access to the full breadth of investors from retail to global institutions. Access to the main board for earlier-stage growth companies is in contrast to a junior board listing, typical in other jurisdictions, where full access to the investor base can be more limited.

Often, institutional investor mandates stipulate fund managers limit their investment to a globally recognised exchange and not extend to many secondary boards or smaller main boards, examples of which are the AIM market in the UK, TSX-V in Canada, GEM in Hong Kong and Catalist in Singapore.

Index inclusion is another key factor. ASX has two globally recognised S&P indices, the S&P/ASX 300 and S&P/ASX 200. The importance of index inclusion to a listed company is the access this provides to institutional investment, both passive and active.

Institutional mandates are typically mandated to a recognised index and when a company enters an index it will lead to extended investment reach, both domestic and global, as that index weight increases.

The institutional investment in the S&P/ASX 200 index is comprised of about 45 per cent from global asset managers and 55 per cent Australian, meaning companies listed on ASX can have a register of globally recognised investors at an earlier stage than other markets.

Achieving global reach.

In the past five years there has been an increase in the number of international companies listing on ASX. It is an attractive listing venue for international companies from a number of different markets but these can be broadly characterised by (i) companies located in a constrained home capital market and (ii) those where size can cause them to be lost in their home market.

Getting lost in your home market.

In contrast, companies from large capital markets such as the United States also benefit from the Australian market dynamics. The size of the US public markets means that earlier-stage companies, with annual revenues below US$100 million or valued at US$1 billion market capitalisation or less, struggle to foster investor attention.

The US private markets are the most active globally and feature high-profile companies such as Uber, Spotify and Airbnb who have held off listing until they are well beyond that size. As a result, there is a whole generation of companies that would prefer to access the public markets, versus private funding, at an earlier stage, but their home exchange cannot support this.

ASX is bridging the gap for companies in these larger markets who would like to use the public markets to raise growth capital and can use ASX as a springboard to reach a size where they would attract attention in their home market.

There are currently 47 US companies listed on ASX. The US cohort of companies range across industries but the recent trend has been in the software and technology sector.

Why are technology companies listing on the ASX?

Technology is the fastest growing sector on the ASX.

Numerous growth-stage technology companies from Australia, the Asia-pacific, the US, Europe and Israel are successfully listing on the ASX with good valuations and traction for scale. These listings illustrate a clear trend which has emerged, that is the ASX is increasingly being used by technology companies as either a stepping stone to a future dual listing on other exchanges or as a long-term listing venue.

Many young technology companies are listed on ASX. Usually, in the US and other major markets, such young companies are considered as mid-stage or late-stage pre-IPO growth firms, and they seek venture capital as Series B, Series C, Series D, etc.

However, in Australia, retail investors accept investing in high-risk young firms that are still figuring-out their growth-model.

The key advantage for investors is that growth in the ASX technology sector, in both domestic and foreign companies, expands the universe of available investing options.

The ASX – A baby Nasdaq.

The ASX is targeting smaller tech companies that would not be able to list on the Nasdaq.

The ASX is positioning itself as a late-stage venture capital funding market with companies that have de-risked their model, have proven their revenue and are looking to scale their businesses and potentially go public to provide liquidity for their shareholders and acquisition currency.

Final Thoughts.

If a company is considering an IPO it will have recognised that it is one of the most important capital markets and wealth creation event in its’ corporate life cycle. That recognition should have extended to all of the factors that will influence the likely success of an IPO. Listing location should be high on that list of factors when formulating an IPO strategy. BlueMount Capital are experts in developing appropriate strategies and facilitating an IPO listing, particularly in Australia. BlueMount would welcome discussing with you how the capital raising opportunity which Australia represents can add value to your listing potential.
Data illustrating the ASX opportunity.

Technology valuations on the ASX.

Examples of US technology companies listed on ASX

Top Ten Technology “Unicorns” on the ASX

About BlueMount Capital

BlueMount Capital specialises in bringing US companies to the ASX, and has an office in Los Angeles to service its American clients

Len McDowall                                                         Alex Chen

Managing Director                                                Director and USA representative

Level 32 200 George St                                                1055 W 7th, 33rd Floor, Penthouse

Sydney 2000 Australia                                                Los Angeles CA 90017 USA

Telephone +61 2 8277 4112                                         Telephone +1 212 470 6997

Email sydney@bluemountcapital.com                    Email losangeles@bluemountcapital.com

 

Healthcare and International Stock Exchange Listings for US companies

An IPO is often the most important capital markets and wealth creation event in your corporate life cycle. Unmatched access to capital at a lower cost is a clear benefit in favour of an IPO, along with corporate branding opportunities and a host of other benefits.

Your company should consider three things when choosing a listing location—the actual out-of-pocket costs for establishing and maintaining the listing, the effects on valuation and liquidity, and the nonfinancial benefits. (A fuller discussion of the pros and cons of listing on the Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) versus the Nasdaq or NYSE can be found in the second of this series of BlueMount Capital’s articles: “International Stock Exchange Listings for US Companies”.)

However, a US private company considering an IPO, with a value of less than US$1 billion is too small to list successfully in the USA these days.

IPOs in the United States typically have significantly high expenses. Legal and accounting fees, printing, brokerage charges to raise the capital, insurances, director fees and other related expenses are substantially higher than in many other countries.

Therefore, as a healthcare company, you should consider all of the relevant factors that all global Listing Exchanges’ offer before committing to what might appear to be the most obvious or easiest IPO route. Are you ready to engage in such considerations?

Why are healthcare companies listing on the ASX?

Are you aware that Australia has a strong healthcare, biotech and med-tech ecosystem with world-class healthcare companies, research facilities and informed investors? This Listing Exchange profile allows companies listing on the ASX to raise capital for both commercialisation and future growth.

With over sixty-five healthcare listings since 2013, the ASX also provides a unique platform to join an impressive peer group of both emerging and mature companies, across pharmaceuticals, medical technology, biotechnology, digital health, medical practice and pathology operations.

The ASX now has sixteen listed healthcare unicorns. In total there are 170 plus healthcare, biotech & med-tech companies listed on ASX with a combined market capitalisation of over A$248 billion.

With numerous growth-stage healthcare companies from Australia, Asia-pacific, the US and Europe successfully listing on the ASX with good valuations and traction for scale, a clear trend has emerged, the ASX is increasingly being used by healthcare companies as either a stepping stone to a future dual-listing on other exchanges or as a long-term listing venue. (A sample of examples of ASX Unicorns is provided in the table below.)

Many young healthcare companies are listed on the ASX. Usually, in the US and other major markets, such young  companies are considered as mid-stage or late-stage pre-IPO growth firms, and they seek venture capital as Series B, Series C, Series D, etc.

However, in Australia, you may be surprised to learn that retail investors accept investing in high-risk young firms that are still figuring out their growth-model. The key advantage for investors is that growth in the ASX healthcare sector, in both domestic and foreign companies, expands the universe of available investment options, which in-turn creates a significant opportunity for healthcare companies like yours!

Observations based upon Healthcare Valuations on the ASX

When comparing the ASX with alternative global listing opportunities for healthcare sector companies, with between $50m and $1bn capitalisation, it is clear that the ASX is second only to the New York based exchanges in terms of the number of companies listing. However, both US exchanges have been trading far longer than the ASX and therefore have a large number are legacy listings. Moreover, these US Exchanges have experienced declining listing numbers and significant increases in qualifying listing valuations over the past ten years.

In the table above, you can see that the Nasdaq and NYSE have far higher median liquidity velocity ratios than the rest of the Exchanges for both larger and smaller healthcare stocks. The ASX is not the leader in terms of the other global Exchanges for small healthcare stocks, it is third behind Singapore and Toronto Stock Exchange, but for larger companies it is the leading Exchange based upon liquidity velocity. Market liquidity is important to your choice of Listing Exchange for a number of reasons, but primarily because it impacts how quickly you can open and close positions. In a liquid market, a seller will quickly find a buyer without having to cut the price of the asset to make it attractive.

Where the ASX outperforms all other exchanges, is in Median EV/Sales and Median P/S multiples where it is the most favourably priced compared to all the other exchanges for smaller healthcare companies

(Enterprise value-to-sales (EV/sales) is a financial ratio that measures how much it would cost to purchase a company’s value in terms of its sales. A lower EV/sales multiple indicates that a company is more attractive investment as it may be relatively undervalued.)

(The price-to-sales (P/S) ratio is a valuation ratio that compares a company’s stock price to its revenues. It is an indicator of the value that financial markets have placed on each dollar of a company’s sales or revenues.)

Looking at the number of companies listed on each of the exchanges and comparing small to large healthcare companies, we can see the ASX is second largest for small, but tied in fourth place for larger capital raises.

From these figures, which lack a longitudinal dimension. it is hard to deduce that the ASX accommodates smaller company listings than larger ones. However, it is clear that the median market value of healthcare listed companies is lower.

In this regard it is clear that one of the ASX’s advantages over listing alternatives is the comparatively low level of market capitalisation required to list. Moreover, the comparatively high level of capitalisation, which it appears to be necessary to list on the Nasdaq, should suggest that for companies with comparatively low levels of capitalisation listing on the Nasdaq may prove difficult.

Final Thoughts

It is evident that the choice of global Listing Exchange, for your healthcare company when considering an IPO, is more complex than is first evident. Understanding how the performance of each Exchange may compliment, or not, the IPO profile of your company requires the appreciation of many factors if your company is to maximise its IPO opportunities. Therefore, if you are considering an IPO, why not contact BlueMount Capital and let them use their expertise to assist you in making the right Listing Exchange decision?

About BlueMount Capital

BlueMount Capital specialises in bringing US companies to the ASX, and has an office in Los Angeles to service its American clients

Len McDowall
Managing Director
Level 32 200 George St
Sydney 2000 Australia
Telephone: +61 2 8277 4112

or

Alex Chen
Director, and USA Representative
Penthouse 1055 W 7th, 33rd Floor,
Los Angeles CA 90017 USA
Telephone: +1 212 470 6997

IPO in the United States? Remember, size matters!

Is your company large enough to IPO in the United States (U.S.)?

You know that when choosing a listing location three things should be considered

(1) the actual out-of-pocket costs for establishing and maintaining the listing;

(2) the effects of a listing location on your company’s valuation and liquidity; and

(3) the non-financial costs and benefits that are available in a particular listing location.

Given that an IPO will often be the most important capital markets and wealth creation event in your corporate life-cycle these considerations should be evaluated very carefully. Unmatched access to capital at a lower cost is a clear benefit of an IPO, along with corporate branding opportunities and a host of other benefits. However, these benefits become insignificant when the analysis that underpins your choice of listing jurisdiction is flawed.

IPOs in the U.S. typically cost significantly more than in other jurisdictions. Legal and accounting fees, printing, brokerage charges to raise the capital, insurances, director fees and other related expenses will be substantially higher in the U.S. than in many other countries. Therefore, it is highly advisable to ensure that a full cost analysis of an IPO listing, in a particular jurisdiction, is completed and then compared with other locations. Our analysis would suggest that the costs and burdens of a U.S. IPO substantially exceed those of other countries.

Have you appreciated the full costs and benefits, including the intangibles, of a U.S. IPO listing as compared with other listing jurisdictions?

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) and NASDAQ are the most prestigious stock markets in the world and therefore represent obvious listing targets. However, the competitiveness of the U.S. public markets has been seriously challenged in recent years * in particular:

  • the valuation of U.S. IPOs has increased by more than six times – this significantly increases the valuation threshold you need to reach for the U.S. to be an IPO capital raising option;
  • the age of companies at the time of a U.S. IPO has increased from approximately six-point-five to ten-point-five years – this reflects the length of time companies require to reach an increasingly higher IPO valuation threshold; and
  • the annual number of U.S. IPOs has decreased from approximately 400 to 100 – this is a good indicator of the impact of the rising valuation threshold.

*Source: Dealogic Capital Markets/Capmktsreg.org

So, the U.S. market represents an increasingly shrinking opportunity for the smaller company seeking to IPO. Do you have a valuation greater than U.S one billion dollars? You don’t, then what are your alternatives?

Private equity is the next obvious choice however this is not necessarily the best alternative by which to grow a private company. Private equity funds tend to place lower valuations on their investee companies than the IPO marketplace. They also often impose shorter exit horizons. Moreover, because private equity investors can have different objectives from the founders of investee companies, there is a real possibility of founders losing control of their company. Were you aware that raising capital from the private equity market comes with some significant downside consequences?

Is raising capital from private equity markets really an attractive option for your company?

Because the presence of a strong IPO market permits founders and other entrepreneurs to retain control of a public company post an IPO, and to grow the company with less dilutive public equity, an IPO is still your most attractive route to investment capital. Unfortunately, this choice is increasingly unavailable to smaller companies.
Why is this the case? Underwriters are increasingly uninterested in comparatively smaller capital raises because:

  • many large institutional investors will not consider investments in companies having small post-IPO market valuations;
  • it becomes much more difficult to obtain coverage of the stock by securities analysts when post-IPO market valuations are projected to be low. As a result, there is a very real risk that these stocks will be deemed so-called orphan stocks (i.e. not followed by any securities analysts); and
  • smaller private companies planning an IPO typically have a higher risk threshold than larger companies in a similar position. Accordingly, smaller private companies are more frequently rejected by the largest most prestigious accounting firms for U.S. IPOs.

Therefore, if you are a U.S. private company considering an IPO, with a value of less than US$1 billion you are very likely to be considered to be too small to list successfully in the USA these days. Furthermore, the costs of funding such an IPO listing are simply uneconomic in the USA.

What are your alternatives?

With no easily accessible IPO market in the United States for smaller companies those U.S. private companies wishing to obtain growth capital are forced to seek private equity financing with all of its associated potential pitfalls.

There are however alternatives for US companies, who have a valuation of less than U.S. one billion dollars, wishing to go public, and are prepared to consider jurisdictions outside of the USA. These locations secure the benefits of an IPO capital raising strategy, importantly, with significantly lower costs. The two most promising jurisdictions are the self-contained regions of Europe and Asia-Pacific. In particular, within the high growth Asia-Pacific region, Australia represents an extremely popular choice.

Have you considered these alternative listing jurisdictions? What does your listing cost analysis of alternative listing jurisdictions tell you? Have you discussed your listing options with expert sources who can provide you with a balanced picture of the alternatives available to you? A well-developed business case building exercise should quickly identify that your company size does matter. Moreover, it matters more in some regions of the capital raising world than in others. Your size therefore will be a major influence in determining your IPO strategy including listing location.

About BlueMount Capital

BlueMount Capital specialises in bringing US companies to the ASX, and has an office in Los Angeles to service its American clients

For further information please contact;

Len McDowall
Managing Director
Level 32 200 George St
Sydney 2000 Australia
Telephone +61 2 8277 4112
email sydney@bluemountcapital.com

Alex Chen
Director and USA representative
1055 W 7th, 33rd Floor, Penthouse
Los Angeles CA 90017 USA
Telephone +1 212 470 6997
email losangeles@bluemountcapital.com

Boyuan Holdings Limited Initial Public Offering Of Shares

Boyuan Holdings Limited (“the Company”), today announced that it has lodged its prospectus with ASIC for an initial public offer of shares in the Company at 20 cents per share to raise a minimum of $15 million and a maximum of $20 million. The Company has also submitted an application to the ASX for admission to the securities market operated by the ASX.

The Company will be valued at approximately $A70 million based on the offer price of 20 cents per share at the maximum subscription of $20 million under the prospectus. boyuan-property-image

The Company existing operations are located in Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province, China, where the Group is predominantly focused on developing a mixed-use commercial and residential property project known as the Jiayuan Central Plaza Project in the heart of a fast developing local town, Wangjiangjing in Jiaxing. The Company has also entered into agreements in respect of three property developments in NSW, in Austral, the Hunter Valley and Marsden Park.

  • The Company, through its subsidiary Boyuan Investment Holding Pty Ltd, has entered into agreements to acquire two parcels of land in the Hunter Valley Region of New South Wales, for the purposes of commercial property development.
  • The Company, through its subsidiary Boyuan Real Estate Holding Pty Ltd, has entered into an agreement to acquire a plot of land in Austral, NSW for the purposes of residential property development.
  • The Company has entered into an agreement to acquire the rights to an option to acquire a plot of land in Marsden Park, NSW for the purposes of residential property development.
  • The Company is also party to a sales and marketing agreement in respect of two property projects located in Lindfield and Marsden Park, NSW.

Commenting, the CEO of Boyuan Holdings Limited, Mr Yading Wan, said:

“Achieving a listing on the Australian Securities Exchange will be a key milestone for the Company as we expand into the Australian property development market. We see Australia as a key part of our international strategy. We believe that Australia’s combination of a stable government, a strong housing sector and skilled workforce provide Boyuan & our investors with significant opportunities.”

Boyuan Holdings Limited ASX: BHL

The Offer opens on 14 September 2016 and will close on 30 September 2016, with trading expected to commence on the ASX on 21 October 2016.

Details of the Offer are contained in the Prospectus lodged with ASIC. BlueMount Capital, with offices in Australia and Asia, is the Australian lead manager for the offer.

Investors interested in applying for shares will need to complete the Application Form in the Prospectus once the Offer opens. Investors should consider the Prospectus in its entirety and obtain professional advice before deciding whether to invest in the Company.

Once the offer opens, the Prospectus can be downloaded from BlueMount Capital’s Website at: www.bluemountcapital.com/BHL

Key Offer Statistics

  • Offer Price per share $0.20
  • Maximum number of shares available under the Offer 100 Million
  • Total number of shares (and equivalent shares) on issue as at the date of this Prospectus 250 Million
  • Number of shares on issue following the Offer based on maximum subscription 350 Million
  • Market capitalisation at Listing based on maximum subscription $70 Million
  • Offer Timetable 14 September 2016 – 30 September 2016
  • Offer opens 14 September 2016 Offer closes
  • 30 September 2016
  • Trading expected to commence on the ASX 21 October 2016

About Boyuan Holdings Limited

boyuan-logo

Boyuan Holdings Limited (“BHL”) conducts property development and management through its Chinese subsidiary (Jiaxing Boyuan Real Estate Development Co., Ltd) in Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province, China. It has recently completed the development of a mixed-use property complex, known as the Jiayuan Central Plaza Project, located in Jiaxing City, Zhejiang Province, China. BHL is currently focusing on future property development opportunities in Australia, in Marsden Park, the Hunter Valley and Austral NSW.

For more information on Boyuan Holdings Limited, visit: www.boyuan.com.au

China Dairy IPO Closes Following Solid Demand

China Dairy Corporation Limited (“China Dairy or “the Company”) today announced the successful closure of its ASX IPO following solid demand from a broad range of investors raising A$17 million.

CDC Logo - 560px
At the offer price of A$0.20 per Chess Depository Interest (“CDI”), China Dairy will have a market capitalisation of approximately A$147 million.
BlueMount Capital was the lead advisor to China Dairy Corporation.

The strong response to the IPO reflects the positive long-term fundamentals for the dairy industry, driven by Chinese consumers’ growing demand for high quality food products, including dairy products. Current milk consumption in China stands at about 20kg per capita, less than a quarter of the average world consumption level(1).

China’s relaxation of its one-child policy has also led researchers1 to estimate that the country will see an average net increase of 3 million people per year and a corresponding RMB 20 billion spent in increased demand for infant formula milk.

The robust pull factors are accompanied by a renewed push by the Chinese government to further modernise agriculture through incorporating new technologies throughout the agricultural value chain to improve productivity, as articulated in the Government’s recent 13th five-year plan.

China Dairy’s Mongolia-based Research & Development facility, which is currently being developed, will underpin the Company’s strategic focus of innovation.
Final allocation and allotment of CDI’s has now been completed. Trading is expected to commence on the 8 April 2016 under the ticker code CDC.
(1) China Agri Research, 8 Jan 2016 “Analysis and forecast on China’s dairy industry” http://en.cnagri.com/report/dairy/20160108/252923.html

About China Dairy Corporation

China Dairy Corporation (“CDC”) is a leading producer and wholesale distributor of raw milk in China; as well as breeder and seller of dairy cows.

Established in 2005, China Dairy Corporation has over 160 employees located in the Company’s operations in China.

Through a number of acquisitions, CDC has grown to become a large dairy farming operation and milk producer in China, with more than 40,000 cows owned by the Company and its partners providing it with an aggregate raw milk production capacity of over 600 tonnes per day.

CDC operates a diversified business model through which the Group expanded beyond breeding company-raised cows, to also outsourcing cattle-raising to farmer-raised and farmer-owned cows – which provides additional revenue streams through the wholesale of raw milk.

The Group has shown consistent historic growth over recent years with FY2015 revenues reaching A$79.1 million and total comprehensive income reaching A$39.5, representing a compounded annual growth rate (CAGR) of 19% and 20% respectively since FY2013. CDC’s FY2015 net profit margins of approximately 50% give it the highest profitability margins when compared to other ASX-listed dairy companies.

For more information on China Dairy Corporation, visit: www.chinadairyco.com
[1] According to a collaborative report by the OECD and the Food and Agricultural Organisation of the UN.

Invest in the First Chinese Dairy Company to List on the ASX – China Dairy Corporation Limited

BlueMount Capital is pleased to announce the Initial Public Offer for China Dairy Corporation is now available.

CDC-Cow-image

Key Facts & Figures

  • Large producer and distributor of raw milk in China
  • CDC and its partners have approx. 40,000 cows
  • Very profitable approx.A$40 million NPAT FY2015
  • FY2015 sales approx. A$80 million and cash at bank approx. A$70 million
  • 10 year operating history
  • Company intends to pay a interim and annual dividends in 2016
  • Experienced board and management
  • Key market: China

The Prospectus for the offer is available from BlueMount Capital and can be obtained via:
www.bluemountcapital.com/CDC

Open Date: 9 November 2015
Close Date: 5 January 2016
Minimum Investment A$ 2,000

Disclaimer

A Prospectus for the offer of Chess Depository Interests (CDI’s) in China Dairy Corporation Limited (ARBN 607 996 449) (Company) a Hong Kong registered entity was lodged with ASIC on 30 October 2015. The Prospectus may be obtained by visiting www.bluemountcapital.com/CDC. Offers of the CDI’s are only made in the Prospectus.
Investors wishing to apply for CDI’s should read the Prospectus carefully prior to deciding whether to acquire the CDI’s. Anyone wishing to acquire the CDI’s offered in the Prospectus will need to complete an application form that will be in, or accompany the Prospectus. Neither the Company, the Lead Manager or the Corporate Advisor make any representations or warranty, express or implied, or provide any guarantee regarding the likely investment returns, the performance of the CDI’s or the Company, or the suitability of the CDI’s for any investor.
Please note that any advice given by BlueMount Capital (Sydney) Pty Ltd is GENERAL advice, as the information or advice given does not take into account your particular objectives, financial situation or needs. Therefore at all times you should consider the appropriateness of the advice before you act further.

iBosses IPO On The ASX Closes

Bosses Corporation Limited ( iBosses) the parent company of iBosses Singapore has announced the successful closure of its initial public offering following solid demand from a broad range of investors.

iBosses-Logo

iBosses is a training and consultancy services provider focused on entrepreneurs and early stage businesses

At the offer price of A$0.20 per share, iBosses will have a market capitalization of A$23 million

Funds raised from the IPO will be used to expand the company’s business centres and to develop the iBosses digital platform

BlueMount Capital acted as Lead Manager and Corporate Advisor to iBosses